The Lone Star tick causes meat allergies

  • Wednesday 13, June 2018 in 11:56 AM
Sharjah24 – Reuters: Data gathered by the Rutgers Center for Vector Biology suggests the aggressive Lone Star tick is spreading to more counties in New Jersey.
A bite from the Lone Star tick activates an allergy to the carbohydrate alpha-gal, and causes the body to overproduce the immunoglobulin E antibodies, according to a study published in the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology.
 
Alpha-gal is found in the cell membranes of most mammals, except primates and humans. It isn’t in poultry or seafood, but is abundant in pork, mutton, and beef. Consequently, those who have been bitten become highly sensitive to meat. Eating red meat triggers a reaction that manifests hours later, with symptoms ranging from itching and hives to stomach cramps, pain, and even anaphylaxis.
 
The meat allergy used to be limited to states in the southeastern U.S., but rising temperatures have caused ticks to spread north and west.
 
Scientists have yet to figure out how exactly how the tick sends antibody production into overdrive, but suspect it may be something in the insect’s saliva.
 
While the allergy currently has no known cure, the symptoms may recede over time.
 
“A bite from a lone star tick activates an allergy to the carbohydrate alpha-gal, and causes the body to overproduce immunoglobulin E antibodies.”
 
“Alpha-gal is found in the cell membranes of most mammals, and is abundant in pork, mutton, and beef.”
 
Also Eating red meat triggers a reaction that manifests hours later, with symptoms ranging from itching and hives to stomach cramps and even anaphylaxis.”
 
“The spread of meat allergy-triggering ticks used to be limited to states in the southeastern U.S., but rising temperatures have caused ticks to spread northward and westward.”